accuracy

The top reason for prescription discrepancies was a patient’s medication incorrectly appearing as inactive in the PIP profile (Table 3). The discrepant medication was listed on the 4-month PIP history in 88 (87%) of the 101 cases, but incorrectly appeared as inactive in 49 (49%) cases. Eight (16%) of these 49 discrepancies were due to dosage changes initiated by the patient (n = 5) or the physician (n = 3), and 13 (27%) were the result of compliance packaging.

The second most common form of discrepancy was a difference between the patient’s reported total daily dose and that recorded in the PIP profile (28/101 [28%]). Warfarin, furosemide, and prednisone were the 3 prescription medications most commonly involved in this type of dosing discrepancy. cialis soft tablets

Table 3. Classification of Prescription Medication Discrepancies between 4-Month PIP Profile and BPMH

No. (%) of Discrepancies
(n
=


101)*


Type of discrepancy


Scheduled


As-Needed


Total


Medications


and As-Directed


Medications


Incorrectly appeared inactive


38 (38)


11 (11)


49 (49)


Incorrectly appeared active


8 (8)


1 (1)


9 (9)


Dose from BPMH
> dose
suggested


on PIP profile


13 (13)


0


13 (13)


Dose from BPMH
< dose
suggested


on PIP profile


15 (15)


0


15 (15)


Drug not listed on PIP profile


9 (9)


4 (4)


13 (13)


Drug strength not listed on PIP profile


1 (1)


0


1 (1)


Drug name not listed on PIP profile


1 (1)


0


1 (1)

BMPH = Best Possible Medication History, PIP = Pharmaceutical Information Program.


*All percentages are based on the total number of discrepa


ncies.

The third most common reason for prescription discrep­ancies was the absence of the patient’s medication from the PIP profile (13/101 [13%]). Six (46%) of these 13 discrepancies were due to the use of medication samples. Medications miss­ing from the PIP profile occurred most frequently with inhaled respiratory agents (6/13 [46%]). Medication samples provided by the physician (4/6 [67%]) and supplies from a recent hospital stay (2/6 [33%]) accounted for these discrepancies. Other prescription medications that patients reported taking but that were absent from the PIP profile included prescription medications dispensed by the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency and old medications that had been restarted by the patient.
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The most common reasons for the 101 prescription medication discrepancies were recent dosage or medication change (18 [18%]), compliance packaging (13 [13%]), noncompliance (12 [12%]), entry error at the dispensing pharmacy (12 [12%]), recent discontinuation of a medication (8 [8%]), and use of as-needed or as-directed medication (8 [8%]). The most common categories of prescription medications involved in the discrepancies were cardiovascular (21 [21%]), inhaled respiratory (16 [16%]), endocrine (14 [14%]), fluid and electrolyte (12 [12%]), and psychiatric (7 [7%]) agents.

The patient’s 12-month PIP profile was helpful in clarifying the prescription discrepancy in 2 (15%) of the 13 cases in which the 12-month profile was reviewed.