Development of a Survey of Asthma Knowledge, Attitudes, and PerceptionsThe Chicago Community Asthma Survey
Recent trends in the social burden of asthma have become part of the debate about the health of the general public. However, there is very little information about the general public’s perception of the diagnosis of asthma and its impact on individuals, their families, and their communities. If the public’s knowledge about asthma is very good, national campaigns targeting asthma awareness, such as the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, are likely to have little impact. If, on the other hand, the general public has some misconceptions about asthma and its impact, these misconceptions may need to be addressed if asthma outcomes are to be improved.
A number of survey instruments have been used to characterize knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about asthma among persons with asthma. However, there appear to be no published survey instruments specifically designed to gain insights into the perception of the general public. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process used in the development of such an instrument, the Chicago Community Asthma Survey (CCAS-32). website

General Overview of Survey Development
The goal of this project was to develop a relatively brief, valid, easy-to-administer survey instrument that can be used to collect information via either telephone or face-to-face interviews. The survey would assess knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about asthma and its management, and serve as an evaluative instrument to track changes in these attributes over time.
Figure 1 presents an overview of the survey development process. Development began with two qualitative steps. First, a review of the published literature guided the initial instrument construction (Step 1). Second, to assess content validity, cognitive interviews and expert reviews were conducted (Step 2). Items were added, modified, and deleted based on the information gathered at each of these steps. In the next step, item performance measurement (Step 3), testing of two samples provided quantitative data to further inform item reduction.

Figure 1. Process of instrument development, testing, and reduction for the Chicago Community Asthma Survey (CCAS-32).

Figure 1. Process of instrument development, testing, and reduction for the Chicago Community Asthma Survey (CCAS-32).